Frankie Stockman - Learning That It is Okay If It Isn't Perfect


Frankie Stockman - Sometimes It is Okay If It Isn't Perfect


- Can you please share a little of your background? For example, where you are from and how your artwork ties into your culture or where you live.

Mt. Whitney, Oil On Canvas by Frankie Stockman
 I am originally from California. I grew up in the In-yo Valley. The only time that my paintings really tie into my past or where I grew up is when I am painting certain scenes in the area that remind me of home. I have even painted a still life of Apricots because when I was a kid, me and my cousin thrived off them in the summers. Her parents had a huge tree in their yard. Cousins really are the best.


- Which situations or experiences have helped you evolve as an artist? For example; what makes you who you are?


My grandparents and my mother are very creative people. My grandfather was a writer, jewelry maker and even made arrowheads. My grandmother crocheted some of the prettiest things I have ever seen and she was a master on the sewing machine. My mother is a poet but she wouldn’t tell you that about her. I grew up around people making things constantly but never knew why until I got older. Then it all made sense. I wasn’t born wanting to be a painter. I wanted to be a fashion designer or a writer.

- Does your work carry a message? If it does not, then can you tell me why you make it?

My work does not carry a message. I always want it to because I always feel that it is supposed to. I try to come up with secret messages, but it never works. I like to tell people that I paint to keep my feet on the ground. It helps me focus and keep my mind straight through the details of the paintings. It is like meditation at times. I forget that the world exists, and I forget that sometimes life is hard. When I am focused on the drawings or paintings, I am free.

- Who are your biggest influences? Why?

When I think of artists I think that my biggest influences are Leonardo Da Vinci, Sandro Botticelli, Thomas Moran and a few more. I seem to always look to them for answers.

- Do you have a current project that you are working on?

I actually have a couple projects that I am working on. I wrote a children’s book a couple of years ago and have not finished it because I am really having a hard time with the illustrations. Other than that I just do what I want when I want. I am also trying to get The Troubled Artist up and running strong. Soon I would like to be able to teach art and teach the pros of being an artist.

- What has been your biggest challenge as an artist when it comes to your work and/or career?

Mentally my biggest challenge has been to accept that I am a real artist. To accept that not everyone is going to love what I am working on and to keep pushing forward even when I don’t want to and to love my own work.

- Do you actively seek out opportunities or do you just go with the flow? Why? How is that working out for you?

I have not in the past and I know I should at some point. But there is always that excuse in the back of my mind; “I am not good enough to be in a show” or “I don’t have many pieces that I’ve done” and let us not forget, “I don’t want to sell most of them because they are for me.” There is always something. I then complain about not making money or getting recognized but, you get what you give, and I don’t really give much.  However, I have shown my art in a couple auctions, gift shops, libraries and even coffee shops. I did actively seek them out for myself. I have also had a few commissions through friends and family.

- Do you find it difficult to price your work? Why?

Yes. You have so many people telling you one thing and then others telling you another. I have heard that I should price by the amount of hours I put into. I have heard that I should price it by how much I would pay for it. I was told once that if you sell a painting for a certain amount, that is what your value becomes for later paintings. I don’t know how much truth is in that. At this point, I just price it by the size and if there is a frame that comes with it.

- Which pieces are you most proud of? Why?

I am super proud of the copy that I did of Paulus Potter’s “the guardian” because it was one of my first paintings and also my pomegranate and lace. I did a really good job on those!
Pomegranate & Lace, Oil on Canvas Paper by Frankie Stockman

- How do you feel after completing a project?

I admit, sometimes I cry. The pride that I feel for myself makes me so happy. Plus, the energy that you put into a piece of art is so intense and when It works out for the best, it is one of greatest  feelings. I can't explain the self-gratification. It’s addictive! I can’t live without that feeling anymore.

- How has art changed or challenged your life?

Art has changed me and helped me grow by making me feel more confident and creative in all other areas of my life. For example, dealing with how I deal with problems or even how I communicate with others. It has changed how I look at myself as well. Sometimes when I am struggling I can always remember that I am good at something. I do have something that not everyone has. I have my talent and I have my art. Before I felt like I was just, here.

Art has challenged me by teaching me to keep going even when I don’t want to. It challenges me when it “tries” to teach me that it’s okay if it’s not perfect. 


You can find more information about Frankie and her recent projects and paintings here: 

Facebook Fan page: Frankie's Love of Art
Twitter: Frankie On Twitter
Pinterest: Frankie's Pinterest


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